May 13, 2021

More campaign audit results released 

Four more completed audit reports of 2018 state Senate races were presented to the Commission. Audited candidates included two Republicans and two Democrats: Jeff Holy and Marty McClendon, and Emily Randall and Jessa Lewis. 
 
The four new limited-scope audits showed that candidates substantially complied with reporting requirements and employed sound internal control procedures. They join previous audits of four other 2018 Senate races.  
 
Next up for the auditors: a review of eight 2020 state House races. 
 

Concepts for digital political ad library discussed 

April 26, 2021
If you work for a government agency – city, county or state –  in Washington, your agency may need to report lobbying.  
 
Your agency may have hired a contract lobbyist, or employees of your agency may need to report lobbying activity. Check our public agency lobbying instructions if you’re not sure whether your agency’s activities need to be reported.  
 
If you do need to report lobbying by a government body, the way to do that is with a quarterly report called the L-5. It is an electronic form that you submit through the PDC website.  
 
April 5, 2021

Commission issues $10,000 in fines for Kennewick Public Facilities District board members  

The Commission voted to fine five members of the Kennewick Public Facilities District Board for violating campaign finance laws during a 2017 unsuccessful campaign to increase sales taxes. 
 
In a written agreement, the five board members — Barbara Johnson, John Neill, Ron Hue, Renee Brooks and Calvin Dudney — acknowledged that they authorized ads, website and other marketing materials in violation of state law that prohibits the use of public resources to promote a ballot measure. 
 
March 31, 2021
The Public Disclosure Commission is soliciting comment on a proposed interpretation to provide guidance for the designation and use of surplus campaign funds, as required under RCW 42.17A.430.  
 
The proposed interpretation addresses the areas where the most frequently asked questions arise.   
 
Please send any written comments to Sean Flynn at  pdc@pdc.wa.gov  by April 16th, 2021. 
March 18, 2021

 

The Commission heard four enforcement cases involving late or missing Personal Financial Affairs (F-1) reports. Officials in each of the four cases had previous violations on record.  

In each case, PDC staff sent multiple emails and other communications in an attempt to make filers aware of their most recent missing reports. 

In PDC Case 80222, the Commission voted to fine Jeff Jernigan, fire commissioner for the West Thurston Regional Fire Authority since 2013, $3,000 in addition to penalties previously assessed for missing F-1 reports. But the $3,000 was suspended, provided that Jernigan files reports for calendar years 2015 through 2018 within 30 days and pays penalties related to previous missing reports totaling $4,000 within 120 days. 

February 10, 2021

A long-running case initiated by a Public Disclosure Commission investigation led to a court ruling Wednesday that initiative campaigner Tim Eyman intentionally violated state campaign finance laws. 

Thurston County Superior Court Judge James J. Dixon found that Eyman misappropriated campaign donations for his personal use and neglected to report hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions. 

Dixon fined Eyman more than $2.6 million and also enjoined Eyman from managing, controlling or directing the finances of any political committees in the future – an action sought by the state. 

The court found that Eyman operated as a continuing political committee and, as such, failed for years to report financial details to the PDC. 

Wednesday’s ruling came in a lawsuit filed in 2017 by state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, following the PDC’s investigation. 

February 8, 2021

New Commission chair for 2021 

Fred Jarrett presided over his first Commission meeting as chair. Jarrett joined the Commission in 2019, following a long career of public service as Mercer Island mayor, state senator and representative and senior deputy county executive in King County.  

Spokane attorney Nancy Isserlis, who joined the PDC in 2020, is the Commission’s new vice chair. 

Rules for Personal Financial Affairs (F-1) statements 

The Commission voted to adopt permanent rules governing requirements for the Personal Financial Affairs (F-1) statements required from elected and appointed officials.  

January 20, 2021

We are seeking feedback on a proposed reorganization of the PDC website so it can better serve you. 

Please participate in an online study to test our new, draft structure.

Participation involves finding a location for information within the structure, and answering survey-style questions. It will take around 15 minutes to complete. Instructions are available before you start the activity.


Click this link to get started: https://anthrotech.optimalworkshop.com/treejack/pdcwebsite

 

December 21, 2020

New Commission Chair and Vice Chair 

The Commission chose Fred Jarrett as its new chair to replace David Ammons, who presided over his final meeting. 

Nancy Isserlis, a Spokane attorney who joined the Commission in 2020, replaces Jarrett as vice chair of the Commission. 

Jarrett joined the PDC in 2019, following a decades-long career of public service as Mercer Island mayor, state senator and representative and Senior deputy county executive in King County. He also had a 35-year career at the Boeing Co. 

Commissioners and PDC staff members thanked Ammons for his dedication to the PDC. 

Jarrett praised Ammons’ ability to build relationships with both PDC staff members and citizens. 

“The respect he treats them with allows them to be the best they can be,” Jarrett said. 

December 8, 2020

The Public Disclosure Commission is soliciting comment on proposed rules that would update F-1 filing requirements and clarify the process for reporting modification requests.

The rules will be the subject of a public hearing at 9:45 a.m. Jan. 28, 2021. Written comments should be submitted to pdc@pdc.wa.gov, attention Sean Flynn, by Jan. 8, 2021.

November 2, 2020

Commission adopts focus areas to meet strategic plan  

The Commission approved five major focus areas for the agency as it works toward the values outlined in the PDC’s strategic plan.  

Commission Chairman David Ammons said the five projects align with the PDC’s mission of promoting confidence in the political process. 

The five areas of focus are: 

October 12, 2020

Curious about who’s funding recall efforts involving local elected officials?  

Here’s how to find that information on the PDC website.  

Recalls are ballot propositions, and groups that raise or spend money to support or fight a ballot proposition are political committees, or PACs.  

To find the PACs involved in a local recall election, start here

The page defaults to the current year. Type the official’s last name (and/or first name) or the committee name in the filter box under the Committee heading. A search may also reveal if there is a committee raising money to defend that official.  

 

September 28, 2020

PDC levies fine against Joshua Freed for violation of campaign loan rules 

The Public Disclosure Commission voted unanimously to fine former Bothell Mayor Joshua Freed $50,000 – with half the penalty suspended – for campaign violations related to personal loans to his unsuccessful 2020 campaign for governor. 

Freed acknowledged in a stipulation negotiated with PDC staff that he exceeded the $6,000 limit on repayment of a personal loan to his campaign. The campaign repaid him at least $450,000 of a $500,000 loan —  later characterized as a contribution – he made at the start of his campaign. He also acknowledged that the campaign filed incorrect reports concerning the contribution and/or loan. 

September 24, 2020

The Public Disclosure Commission Thursday voted unanimously to fine former Bothell Mayor Joshua Freed $50,000 – with half the penalty suspended – for campaign violations related to personal loans to his unsuccessful 2020 campaign for governor. 

Freed acknowledged in a stipulation negotiated with PDC staff that he exceeded the $6,000 limit on repayment of a personal loan to his campaign. The campaign repaid him at least $450,000 of a $500,000 loan  –  later characterized as a contribution – he made at the start of his campaign. He also acknowledged that the campaign filed incorrect reports concerning the contribution and/or loan. 

The stipulation cited aggravating factors in the case, noting that the loans and/or contributions made up the majority of Freed’s campaign funds and that the public was deprived of significant information for a good portion of the 2020 primary election cycle. 

September 17, 2020

A new PDC tool helps the public visualize candidate campaign reports by mapping the sources of their campaign cash and showing how their financial support has changed over time.  

You’ll find the “Show me the money” application via a link on each candidate’s campaign overview page. (The exception is some small-dollar campaigns that don’t have to report contributions.) 

Use this link to browse 2020 candidates. Enter the candidate name in the search box at the top of the page, and you’ll find the candidate overview page. Clicking the map image will take you to the visualization dashboard.  

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